Florence Court, County Fermanagh
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Florence Court, County Fermanagh

Florence Court is one of the most important neo-classical 18th century houses in the country. It was named after Florence Bourchier-Wrey, who married John Cole in 1707. The property was inherited by their son, who was elevated to the Irish peerage as Baron Mountflorence in 1760. The present mansion dates from 1751-64, with wings added […]

Dunrobin Castle
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Golspie, East Coast

Golspie is an attractive town off the main drag, and would be a congenial option for a day or two.   One mile north of town is mighty Dunrobin Castle, the largest house in the Highlands (187 rooms). Although it dates to around 1275, most of what you see today was built in French style […]

Cahir Castle, County Tipperary
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Cahir Castle, County Tipperary

Cahir Castle is on an island commanding the Suir bridge, the largest of its period in Ireland, was built in the 15th century by successive members of the Butler family, lords of Cahir, on the site of a 13th century Norman fortress, restored in 1840 and 1964. It comprises an elaborate curtain wall between round […]

Dunottar Castle
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Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire

Known throughout Scotland as the granite city, much of the town was built using silvery grey granite hewn from the now abandoned Rubislaw Quarry, at one time the biggest artificial hole in the ground in Europe. On a sunny day, the granite lends an attractive glitter to the city, but when low, grey rain clouds […]

Castle Coole, County Fermanagh
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Castle Coole, County Fermanagh

Castle Coole is an imposing mansion built in 1790-98 for the Earl of Belmore by James Wyatt. The portraits of George I and Queen Charlotte by Ramsey hang in the hall. Highlights include some notable plasterwork by Joseph Rose, an Italian marble topped table and clock in the drawing room; distinctively shaped doors by George […]

Isle of Muck, Small Isles
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Isle of Muck, Small Isles

The tiny island of Muck, measuring just 2 miles by 1 mile, has exceptionally fertile soil, and the island is carpeted with wild flowers in spring and early summer. It takes its name from the Gaelic muc (pig), and pigs are still raised here.   Ferries call at the southern settlement of Port Mor. There […]

Downpatrick Cathedral, County Down
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Downpatrick Cathedral, County Down

The cathedral was built in 1790-1827, but it retains some portions of the older building, notably part of the east end (possibly the work of de Courcy), with its recessed doorway and trefoil niches. Within, arcades survive from the 13th, 15th and 16th centuries, and the font (retrieved in 1931 from a farmyard after being […]

Glasgow Cathedral, Scotland
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Glasgow Cathedral, Scotland

An attraction that shouldn’t be missed, Glasgow Cathedral has a rare timelessness. The dark, imposing interior conjures up medieval might and can send a shiver down the spine. It’s a shining example of pre-Reformation Gothic architecture, and the only mainland Scottish cathedral to have survived the Reformation. Most of the current building dates from the […]

Abbey Knockmoy
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Mount Bellew & Abbey Knockmoy, Ireland

Southwest of Roscommon to Galway via the demesne of Mount Bellew (landscaped by Hely Dutton; mansion demolished), shortly passing the battlefield of Knockdoe, where in August 1504 Gerald Fitzgerald, the Great Earl of Kildare, defeated his son-in-law Ulick de Burgh. Abbey Knockmoy was founded for Cistercians by Cathal O’Connor ‘of the Red Hand’ to commemorate […]

Ennis, County Clare
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Ennis, County Clare

North of the narrow streets of the old town stands the Court House, a Classical building of 1850-52 with original interior finishes. The ruined friary near the centre by the river, was founded by Donough Cairbrearch O’Brien in 1242, and surprised in 1543. An incongruous top storey with ugly spirelets has been added to the […]