Ireland Luxury Tours Presents the Luxury Irish Grand Tour

Our Luxury Irish Grand Tour offers you the chance to experience the best of Ireland. Travelling north, south, east, west and through the Midlands, our Luxury Irish Grand Tour guarantees an awe-inspiring range of sights and experiences that will make your visit to Ireland a holiday of a lifetime.

 

Starting in Belfast or Dublin, Ireland Luxury Tours can tailor your luxury tour of Ireland to suit your time constraints, interests and needs.  We use only the best hotels, restaurants and luxury vehicles to ensure you have a safe, comfortable and care-free holiday. Whether you have only a few days, a week, a fortnight, or even longer, Ireland Luxury Tours can build a trip to suit you. Just look at a few examples of what you can choose to include in your personalised itinerary:

 

NORTHERN IRELAND

 

Belfast is the province’s capital, with attractive city buildings. The coast of County Antrim has some of Ireland’s most spectacular scenery, including the famous Giant’s Causeway with its dramatic cliffs and volcanic rocks, as well as quaint fishing villages and Carrickfergus Castle. The Mountains of Mourne rise along the coast in the south-east corner of County Down, which has several sites linked to St Patrick around Downpatrick. The historic city of Armagh is in neighbouring Co Armagh, as is the huge Lough Neagh. To the west is Co Tyrone with the Ulster American folk Park. Enniskillen is the main town of County Fermanagh, a lakeland county with many attractions set around Lough Erne. The walled city of Derry is in County Londonderry, which has a fine stretch of coast.

Belfast: trace the city’s fascinating social, industrial and political history. Enjoy the nightlife, the cuisine and architecture of this vibrant city.

 

Armagh: two historic cathedrals grace the skyline of one of Ireland’s oldest cities, founded in the time of St Patrick.

 

Derry: walk around the ramparts of the 17th century town walls and admire the historic buildings within.

 

Giants Causeway: walk along the volcanic stepping stones of Northern Ireland’s most popular site.

 

Glens of Antrim: travel the scenic trails in the glacier-carved glens that wind up from the scenic Antrim Coast Road.

 

Lough Erne: take a boat trip to White Island to see this strange car of figures on the old church.

 

Ulster American Folk Park: relive the experience of Ulster immigrants to the New World during the famine years.

 

DUBLIN

 

The Republic of Ireland’s vibrant capital has lively pubs, restaurants and nightclubs, and numerous historic and contemporary attractions. It has a population of just over 1 million.

 

Book of Kells: this magnificent 9th century illuminated manuscript in the Old Library at Trinity College represents the height of Celtic artistic achievement.

Christ Church Cathedral and St Patrick’s Cathedral: Dublin’s two grand cathedrals are filled with monuments to historic figures, from Strongbow to Jonathan Swift.

 

Dublin Castle: historic heart of the city, the castle has Viking and Norman foundations and lavish State Apartments.

 

Guinness Storehouse: drink a pint of Ireland’s most famous brew while enjoying the view from the rooftop bar.

 

Howth Head: take the cliff walk out beyond Howth Harbour for sweeping sea views over the bay.

 

Kilmainham Gaol: learn the poignant history of the Irish fight for independence on a tour of the jail where Irish rebels were held and executed.

 

The National Museum: marvel at the stunning gold jewellery and other treasures that make up the largest collection of Celtic objects in the world.

 

St Stephen’s Green: do as the locals do — relax on a park bench and watch the passers-by.

 

THE EAST

 

Bordering the Irish Sea, the Eastern counties contain some of the country’s most visited at attractions. North of Dublin, the ancient sites of the Boyne Valley lie in County Meath, while County Louth has outstanding monastic ruins. Inland along the border with Northern Ireland, Monaghan and Cavan are quiet lakeland counties. West of Dublin, Ireland’s famous racehorses are bred in the rolling pastures of County Kildare, home of the National Stud. South of the capital are the Wicklow Mountains, with Powerscourt Gardens and the monastic site of Glendalough, leading south to Wexford and that its

wildfowl reserve. Inland are counties Carlow and Kilkenny, with a fine castle and mediaeval sites.

 

Boyne Valley: drive through beautiful scenery to visit fine monastic sites and the seat of the High Kings of Tara.

 

Bru na Boinne: tour the mysterious passage tombs at Newgrange and Knowth, over 5000 years old and among the world’s most important prehistoric sites.

 

Glendalough: set in a valley beside two lakes, this is one of Ireland’s foremost and loveliest early Christian sites.

 

Kilkenny: after touring the magnificent St Canice’s Cathedral, castle and Black Abbey, explore the medieval alleyways and lively streets of this delightful historic town.

 

National Stud and Japanese Gardens: learn the secret of breeding Ireland’s finest racehorses at the National Stud in Kildare, and enjoy the charming Japanese Gardens.

 

Powerscourt Gardens: enjoy the superb view from the terrace, then wander through the beautiful gardens.

 

Wexford: See how early settlers lived at the Irish National Heritage Park.

 

Wicklow Mountains: take a walk along the Wicklow Way in the Wicklow Mountains National Park.

 

THE SOUTH

Christ Church Cathedral and St Patrick’s Cathedral: Dublin’s two grand cathedrals are filled with monuments to historic figures, from Strongbow to Jonathan Swift.

 

Dublin Castle: historic heart of the city, the castle has Viking and Norman foundations and lavish State Apartments.

 

Guinness Storehouse: drink a pint of Ireland’s most famous brew while enjoying the view from the rooftop bar.

 

Howth Head: take the cliff walk out beyond Howth Harbour for sweeping sea views over the bay.

 

Kilmainham Gaol: learn the poignant history of the Irish fight for independence on a tour of the jail where Irish rebels were held and executed.

 

The National Museum: marvel at the stunning gold jewellery and other treasures that make up the largest collection of Celtic objects in the world.

 

St Stephen’s Green: do as the locals do — relax on a park bench and watch the passers-by.

 

THE EAST

 

Bordering the Irish Sea, the Eastern counties contain some of the country’s most visited at attractions. North of Dublin, the ancient sites of the Boyne Valley lie in County Meath, while County Louth has outstanding monastic ruins. Inland along the border with Northern Ireland, Monaghan and Cavan are quiet lakeland counties. West of Dublin, Ireland’s famous racehorses are bred in the rolling pastures of County Kildare, home of the National Stud. South of the capital are the Wicklow Mountains, with Powerscourt Gardens and the monastic site of Glendalough, leading south to Wexford and that its wildfowl reserve. Inland are counties Carlow and Kilkenny, with a fine castle and mediaeval sites.

 

Boyne Valley: drive through beautiful scenery to visit fine monastic sites and the seat of the High Kings of Tara.

 

Bru na Boinne: tour the mysterious passage tombs at Newgrange and Knowth, over 5000 years old and among the world’s most important prehistoric sites.

 

Glendalough: set in a valley beside two lakes, this is one of Ireland’s foremost and loveliest early Christian sites.

 

Kilkenny: after touring the magnificent St Canice’s Cathedral, castle and Black Abbey, explore the medieval alleyways and lively streets of this delightful historic town.

 

National Stud and Japanese Gardens: learn the secret of breeding Ireland’s finest racehorses at the National Stud in Kildare, and enjoy the charming Japanese Gardens.

 

Powerscourt Gardens: enjoy the superb view from the terrace, then wander through the beautiful gardens.

 

Wexford: See how early settlers lived at the Irish National Heritage Park.

 

Wicklow Mountains: take a walk along the Wicklow Way in the Wicklow Mountains National Park.

 

THE SOUTH

The bustling city of Waterford, along the south coast, is famous for its crystal glassworks, while the surrounding county has pretty harbours, fishing villages and market towns. Inland, bordering the Midlands and the East, Co Tipperary is ringed by low mountains that form the backdrop to attractive river valleys, historic towns such as Clonmel and Caher, and the famous Rock of Cashel. Bordering the West is County Limerick, whose northern boundary is defined by Ireland’s longest river, the Shannon. Limerick, Ireland’s fourth largest city and western international gateway, has a historic hub with fine churches, museums and galleries. Many castles, both ruined and restored, dot the rolling landscape that leads to lovely beaches on the coast. Inland are picturesque villages such as Adare, and the Stone Age settlement of Lough Gur. The dramatic scenery of counties Cork and Kerry in the island’s western corner makes them among the most visited regions of Ireland. Killarney and Kenmare make good bases for driving the famous Ring of Kerry, round one of several wild, rocky peninsulas that stretch into the sea. To the north, the Dingle Peninsula lies west from Tralee with rugged mountains, stunning seascapes, and fascinating ancient forts and beehive huts. Cork is Ireland’s second largest city, known for its art and music scene. Nearby is the famous Blarney Castle and the picturesque coastal town of Kinsale.

 

Blarney Castle: kiss the Blarney Stone at one of Ireland’s most famous castles.

 

Cork City: explore the picturesque liens of the old French quarter, in the heart of Ireland’s second city.

 

Dingle Peninsula: duck inside the curious beehive huts, among the many ancient sites on this scenic peninsula.

 

Kinsale: enjoy as seafood meal in one of the highly acclaimed restaurants in this pretty harbour town.

Ring of Kerry: drive the most famous scenic route in western Ireland, but start early to avoid the many tour buses.

 

Rock of Cashel: walk to the top of this monumental fortress church, an impressive sight from above and below.

 

Sheen Falls Lodge: relax at this former fishing lodge, neither beautiful luxury Hotel on the banks of the Sheen River.

 

Take a sea cruise to the Skelligs: and spot dolphins and other wildlife along the way.

 

Waterford: shop for a special piece of glassware at Waterford Crystal.

 

THE WEST

 

Bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the South and the Midlands, the Western counties have some of the most fascinating scenery in Ireland. North of the Shannon River, Co Clare is home to the stark limestone plateau called the Burren and the towering Cliffs of Moher. Ennis is its largest town. Co Galway’s capital is lively Galway city, set on Galway Bay. Offshore are the largely Irish speaking Aran Islands. Between here and Clifden stretches Connemara, with its rugged sea coasts, mountains and heathlands. Westport is the main town in County Mayo, home to Croagh Patrick and the miraculous shrine of Knock. It is a large county of vast boglands, lonely headlands and dramatic sea cliffs. From Sligo town visit County Sligo’s picturesque coastline, mountains, lakes and forests that inspired the poet WB Yeats. There are also many prehistoric sites. Carrick-on-Shannon is the capital of neighbouring Co Leitrim. County Donegal in the northwestern corner borders Northern Ireland. Donegal town and Letterkenny are the biggest towns in this large but sparsely populated region. Its stunning

Atlantic coastline is studded with rocky inlets, towering cliffs and deserted beaches.

 

The Burren: walk out across the limestone and look for the tiny wildflowers that brighten the barren landscape.

 

Carrowmore Megalithic Cemetery: see the passage graves, standing stones and other remains of one of Europe’s oldest and largest prehistoric burial sites.

 

Cliffs of Moher: enjoy the awesome view from the top of these coastal cliffs.

 

Connemara: mountains, lakes, boglands and the jagged coastline of rocky bays and islets make this one of the most scenic areas of the country.

 

County Mayo: the drive from stunning seascapes to remote mountains to lonely stretches of blanket bog that are amazing in their vastness.

 

Galway City: bright shop-fronts and mediaeval buildings line the cobbled streets in this lively university time.

 

Glencolumbkille: it’s well worth the drive to this remote Gaeltacht village to see its excellent folk museum surrounded by beautiful scenery.

 

Glenveagh National Park: stroll through the stunning gardens amid beautiful mountains and woodland.

 

Gregans Castle: escape from it all at this hotel in the heart of The Burren and enjoy the views towards Galway Bay.

Ring of Kerry: drive the most famous scenic route in western Ireland, but start early to avoid the many tour buses.

 

Rock of Cashel: walk to the top of this monumental fortress church, an impressive sight from above and below.

 

Sheen Falls Lodge: relax at this former fishing lodge, neither beautiful luxury Hotel on the banks of the Sheen River.

 

Take a sea cruise to the Skelligs: and spot dolphins and other wildlife along the way.

 

Waterford: shop for a special piece of glassware at Waterford Crystal.

 

THE WEST

 

Bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the South and the Midlands, the Western counties have some of the most fascinating scenery in Ireland. North of the Shannon River, Co Clare is home to the stark limestone plateau called the Burren and the towering Cliffs of Moher. Ennis is its largest town. Co Galway’s capital is lively Galway city, set on Galway Bay. Offshore are the largely Irish speaking Aran Islands. Between here and Clifden stretches Connemara, with its rugged sea coasts, mountains and heathlands. Westport is the main town in County Mayo, home to Croagh Patrick and the miraculous shrine of Knock. It is a large county of vast boglands, lonely headlands and dramatic sea cliffs. From Sligo town visit County Sligo’s picturesque coastline, mountains, lakes and forests that inspired the poet WB Yeats. There are also many prehistoric sites. Carrick-on-Shannon is the capital of neighbouring Co Leitrim. County Donegal in the northwestern corner borders Northern Ireland. Donegal town and Letterkenny are the biggest towns in this large but sparsely populated region. Its stunning 

Atlantic coastline is studded with rocky inlets, towering cliffs and deserted beaches.

 

The Burren: walk out across the limestone and look for the tiny wildflowers that brighten the barren landscape.

 

Carrowmore Megalithic Cemetery: see the passage graves, standing stones and other remains of one of Europe’s oldest and largest prehistoric burial sites.

 

Cliffs of Moher: enjoy the awesome view from the top of these coastal cliffs.

 

Connemara: mountains, lakes, boglands and the jagged coastline of rocky bays and islets make this one of the most scenic areas of the country.

 

County Mayo: the drive from stunning seascapes to remote mountains to lonely stretches of blanket bog that are amazing in their vastness.

 

Galway City: bright shop-fronts and mediaeval buildings line the cobbled streets in this lively university time.

 

Glencolumbkille: it’s well worth the drive to this remote Gaeltacht village to see its excellent folk museum surrounded by beautiful scenery.

 

Glenveagh National Park: stroll through the stunning gardens amid beautiful mountains and woodland.

 

Gregans Castle: escape from it all at this hotel in the heart of The Burren and enjoy the views towards Galway Bay.

Sligo: base yourself in this lively town, for music, the arts, and the landscape that influenced poet WB Yeats.

 

THE MIDLANDS

 

The defining features of the landlocked Midlands are the many loughs that dot the landscape and the vast stretches of bogland that cover much of counties Offaly and Laois. Clonmacnoise is one of Ireland’s finest ecclesiastical sites. The Georgian town of Birr has delightful castle gardens. County Westmeath boasts the region’s largest town in, Athlone, and the country’s largest castle, Tullynally. It adjoins counties Longford and Roscommon; in the latter is Strokestown Park and the Famine Museum.

 

Birr: admire the splendid gardens of Birr Castle, with plants from around the world, and see the great telescope.

 

Blackwater Bog: take a narrow-gauge train for a close-up look at the boglands and learn how they were formed.

 

Clonmacnoise: admire the elaborate stone-carved high crosses, round t the owers and ruined churches at this important early Christian monastery.

 

Strokestown Park and Famine Museum: visit the Famine Museum, where the tragedy of the famine years is movingly portrayed.

 

Watersports: try a spot of fishing on Loch Ree or a canoe trip on the Shannon River.

 

THE LUXURY IRISH GRAND TOUR EXPERIENCE

Whatever way you would like us to tailor your Luxury Irish Grand Tour, we guarantee to immerse you in the Irish way of life so that you can experience first-hand what it is like to be Irish.

 

Attend a ceili were you can watch reels, jigss and other dances. Set dancing is big in the West and you can even join in!

 

Brush up on Ireland’s literary history on a literary pub crawl in Dublin and visit the Dublin writers Museum.

 

Drink Guinness with the locals in a pub, or tour the Guinness Storehouse and have a pint in the Gravity Bar.

 

Drive along the Antrim Coast, a spectacular scenic route that begins north of Belfast and runs all the way to the Giants Causeway.

 

Eat some Galway Bay oysters, wild salmon or mussel soup — Ireland offers excellent fresh seafood.

 

Experience of Ireland’s famous passion for horses attend a race meeting and maybe even place a small bet.

 

Get sporty. Play a round of golf at one of Ireland’s many courses, or visit Croke Park to watch a Gaelic football or hurling match.

 

Hop on a ferry to Achill Island or to the Aran Islands for a sense of tradition and timelessness.

 

Listen to some live, traditional music; some of the best can be found in villages on the south and west coasts. 

Marvel at the views. Look out from the high ramparts of a castle tower and admire the view, such as that over the Boyne River from the castle at Trim.

 

Pack a picnic and head for a remote spot on the Beara, Mizen or Sheeps Head peninsulas. There are less busy but just as scenic as the Ring of Kerry.

 

Party on St Patrick’s Day or at one of the many other festivals around the country.

 

Seek out Ireland’s prehistoric sites. The remote, less visited sites are often the most rewarding and retain a sense of ancient spirituality.

 

Shop for traditional Irish goods such as Aran sweaters or Donegal tweed.

 

Take a hike. From woodland strolls to cliff-top rambles along the coast there are walks to suit everyone.

 

Trace your ancestors. Every region has local offices that can help.

 

Watch a sunset from the Cliffs of Moher or any number of scenic spots on Ireland’s west coast.

 

The most striking feature of Ireland is the legendary 40 shades of green that make up the Emerald Island. You may have to put up with the unpredictable showers of its maritime climate, but your reward is the dazzling spectrum of colour on the lush pastures and rolling hills when the sun breaks through.

 

Some 6 million visitors come to Ireland every year to see its prehistoric monuments, castles and high crosses, crumbling monasteries and stately homes. But although the island looks small on a map, don’t assume you can tour it quickly. It’s winding country roads and beautiful scenery demand a leisurely pace. Besides, it’s almost sacrilege to hurry in Ireland. Take time to 

Marvel at the views. Look out from the high ramparts of a castle tower and admire the view, such as that over the Boyne River from the castle at Trim.

 

Pack a picnic and head for a remote spot on the Beara, Mizen or Sheeps Head peninsulas. There are less busy but just as scenic as the Ring of Kerry.

 

Party on St Patrick’s Day or at one of the many other festivals around the country.

 

Seek out Ireland’s prehistoric sites. The remote, less visited sites are often the most rewarding and retain a sense of ancient spirituality.

 

Shop for traditional Irish goods such as Aran sweaters or Donegal tweed.

 

Take a hike. From woodland strolls to cliff-top rambles along the coast there are walks to suit everyone.

 

Trace your ancestors. Every region has local offices that can help.

 

Watch a sunset from the Cliffs of Moher or any number of scenic spots on Ireland’s west coast.

 

The most striking feature of Ireland is the legendary 40 shades of green that make up the Emerald Island. You may have to put up with the unpredictable showers of its maritime climate, but your reward is the dazzling spectrum of colour on the lush pastures and rolling hills when the sun breaks through.

 

Some 6 million visitors come to Ireland every year to see its prehistoric monuments, castles and high crosses, crumbling monasteries and stately homes. But although the island looks small on a map, don’t assume you can tour it quickly. It’s winding country roads and beautiful scenery demand a leisurely pace. Besides, it’s almost sacrilege to hurry in Ireland. Take time to chat with the locals, linger in the brightly painted coastal towns or vibrant cities, share a story or a song in a local pub. Through the people, as well as the places, you will discover the magic of Ireland.