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The seaside village of Ardmore stands on a promontory known mainly for its association with St Declan, the 5th century missionary who brought Christianity o this part of Ireland. St Declan is said to have been at sea when, in answer to prayer, a floating rock...

Jura lies off the coast of Argyll, long, dark and low like a vast Viking longship, its billowing sail the distinctive triple peaks of the Paps of Jura. A magnificently wild and lonely island, it’s the perfect place to get away from it all –...

Rassay is the rugged, 10-mile-long island that has off Skye’s east coast. There are several good walks here, including one to the flat-topped conical hill of Dun (443m). The extraordinary ruin of Brochel Castle, perched on a pinnacle at the northern end of Raasay, was home...

The town of the ‘ford of the kings’ is an old walled settlement that once lay at the intersection of three kingdoms those of the O’Kellys, O’Flahertys and O’Heynes. The Anglo-Norman lord, Meiler de Bermingham, built a stout castle here in about 1240 and, as...

Shetland’s most impressive archaeological attraction. This large settlement, with buildings from Prehistory through Norse times to the 16th century, was hidden under the sand until it was exposed by a gale at the end of the 19th Century. It’s a thought-provoking place, mainly in ruins, but...

The village of Myshall, with Mount Leinster and the Blackstairs range towering above it, contains a surprise - a church that is reminiscent of Salisbury Cathedral. It was built by an Englishman, John Duguid of Dover, around the graves of his Wife and daughter. His daughter,...

Please come and see our superb "destination wedding" packages and "honeymoon" offers at the Hyatt Hotel this Sunday 19th October 2014. After our success at the San Diego Wedding Show last weekend interest in having a romantic wedding or honeymoon in Ireland and Scotland is growing...

Not far from the cathedral and with dramatic coastline views, St Andrews Castle is mainly in ruins, but the site itself is evocative. The most intriguing feature is the complex of siege tunnels, said to be the best surviving example of siege engineering in Europe....

Rearing up from a steep hill like a jagged, broken tooth and visible for miles around is the shattered tower of the castle stronghold of the Fitzgeralds, Earls of Desmond. Their war cry, until such cries were banned by Henry VI, was ‘Shanid Abu’ (‘Shanid...

Blantyre’s most famous son is David Livingstone, epitome of the Victorian missionary-explorer, who opened up central Africa to European religion. The David Livingstone Centre, tells the story of his life. In 30 years it’s estimated he travelled 29,000 miles, mostly on foot - the sheer...