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One travel writer displayed typical Scottish pride, if not ingenuity, by writing that Ailsa Craig was from a certain angle a perfect pyramid, ‘with this advantage over the pyramids of Egypt, but twice their height’. Ailsa Craig, the fairy rock, Paddy’s Milestone (so called because...

This town is in Aberdeenshire and can be easily accessed on any tours of Scotland.   Huntly owes its existence to the Gordon family and has a history of linen and woollen manufacturing. The town is surrounded by pleasant hills. It’s a pleasant place to visit.   But the real hidden...

This town/village is on the famed Ring of Kerry. Probably somewhere that most tours of Ireland will visit. It has an interesting and quirky history.   In the early part of the 19th century Cahersiveen was so cut off from the rest of Ireland it had greater contacts with...

The oddly shaped ‘inch’ is surely the strangest of the Firth of Forth islands. Its abbey (the Abbey of the Inch of Saint Columba) was out of gratitude to a hermit who had offered him shelter during a stormy passage on the Forth. It consists...

This market town in the North of Ireland has a few things to see on any tours of Ireland.   The earliest parts of Enniskillen Castle date from the 15th century. It houses a very impressive military museum. The castle sits on an island between Lower Lough Erne, and...

This village stands on the actual border between England and Scotland. It comprises Gretna Green and Springfield.   The village is famous as the place where runaway couples from England came to be married in accordance with 18th century Scottish law. That is by means of declaration before witnesses.   These...

This is the largest body of inland water in Great Britain and well worth seeing on any tours of Scotland. It is 24 miles long and varies in width from ¾ mile to 5 miles. There are 30 islands in Loch Lomond.   One island is Inchmurrin, which has...

Waterford is most famous for its Crystal. It will be mentioned on any tours of Ireland as such.   But the city has a fascinating history. It is set on the South bank of the River Suir and was founded by the Normans.   Right on the quay is the ancient...

In North Clare, near the Cliffs of Moher, lies the strangest landscape in Ireland. The Burren is a bare, hilly, area of about 100 square miles. It is devoid of trees and surface water which is unusual for Ireland. Many compare it to the surface of the moon. It...

The coast road north from Edinburgh to Saint Andrews and Tayside is for part of its route a series of links between small medieval fishing villages of similar appearance: St Monance, Pittenweem, Anstruther and, the most north-easterly, Crail. James VI called these royal burghs the...