Our Blog

Drogehda, County Louth This close packed town, with its old buildings clustered in 13th century streets, retains a medieval feel. Two towns were founded on either side of the River Boyne by the Anglo-Norman Hugh de Lacy. In 1412 they were united by charter to become...

About the Isle of Tiree Low-lying Tiree (pronounced tye-ree; from the Gaelic tiriodh, meaning ‘land of corn’) is a fertile sward of lush, green machair liberally sprinkled with yellow buttercups, much of it so flat that, from a distance, the houses seem to rise out of...

A short boat trip away from Ballycastle harbour is Rathlin Island, said in legend to have been dropped into the sea by the mother of the legendary hero Finn MacCool, on her way to Scotland. The habitation of this 6 mile long, L-shaped island is...

The Knoydart Peninsula is the only sizeable area in Britain that remains inaccessible to the motor car, cut off by miles of rough country and the embracing arms of Lochs Nevis and Hourn – Gaelic for the lochs of Heaven and Hell. No road penetrates...

The seaside village of Ardmore stands on a promontory known mainly for its association with St Declan, the 5th century missionary who brought Christianity o this part of Ireland. St Declan is said to have been at sea when, in answer to prayer, a floating rock...

Jura lies off the coast of Argyll, long, dark and low like a vast Viking longship, its billowing sail the distinctive triple peaks of the Paps of Jura. A magnificently wild and lonely island, it’s the perfect place to get away from it all –...

Rassay is the rugged, 10-mile-long island that has off Skye’s east coast. There are several good walks here, including one to the flat-topped conical hill of Dun (443m). The extraordinary ruin of Brochel Castle, perched on a pinnacle at the northern end of Raasay, was home...

The town of the ‘ford of the kings’ is an old walled settlement that once lay at the intersection of three kingdoms those of the O’Kellys, O’Flahertys and O’Heynes. The Anglo-Norman lord, Meiler de Bermingham, built a stout castle here in about 1240 and, as...

Shetland’s most impressive archaeological attraction. This large settlement, with buildings from Prehistory through Norse times to the 16th century, was hidden under the sand until it was exposed by a gale at the end of the 19th Century. It’s a thought-provoking place, mainly in ruins, but...

The village of Myshall, with Mount Leinster and the Blackstairs range towering above it, contains a surprise - a church that is reminiscent of Salisbury Cathedral. It was built by an Englishman, John Duguid of Dover, around the graves of his Wife and daughter. His daughter,...