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The tiny island of Muck, measuring just 2 miles by 1 mile, has exceptionally fertile soil, and the island is carpeted with wild flowers in spring and early summer. It takes its name from the Gaelic muc (pig), and pigs are still raised here.   Ferries call...

The cathedral was built in 1790-1827, but it retains some portions of the older building, notably part of the east end (possibly the work of de Courcy), with its recessed doorway and trefoil niches. Within, arcades survive from the 13th, 15th and 16th centuries, and...

An attraction that shouldn’t be missed, Glasgow Cathedral has a rare timelessness. The dark, imposing interior conjures up medieval might and can send a shiver down the spine. It’s a shining example of pre-Reformation Gothic architecture, and the only mainland Scottish cathedral to have survived...

Southwest of Roscommon to Galway via the demesne of Mount Bellew (landscaped by Hely Dutton; mansion demolished), shortly passing the battlefield of Knockdoe, where in August 1504 Gerald Fitzgerald, the Great Earl of Kildare, defeated his son-in-law Ulick de Burgh. Abbey Knockmoy was founded for...

North of the narrow streets of the old town stands the Court House, a Classical building of 1850-52 with original interior finishes. The ruined friary near the centre by the river, was founded by Donough Cairbrearch O’Brien in 1242, and surprised in 1543. An incongruous...

Lodged snugly in a lush valley alongside the M90, Perth’s biggest drawcard is historical Scone Palace, but the city’s grand Georgian buildings by the banks of the River Tay possess their own splendour. This market town was once a weaving, dyeing and glove-making centre and...

Beautifully situated on the River Lee, Cork City is after Dublin and Belfast, the 3rd city of Ireland with long established Choral, Film and Jazz Festivals. The rich farmland of Cork (the largest of the 32 counties) is separated by the Ballyhoura, Galty and the...

Newtownards, now a busy manufacturing centre in an old town, despite its name. It dates from 1244, when a Dominican Priory was founded here by Walter de Burgh, the church of which still stands in ruins in Court Square, off Castle Street. Of the existing...

The cliffs form a sheer precipice, 8km long; one of the most impressive stretches of coast in the west of Ireland. During the nesting season a remarkable variety of seabirds nest here, among them guillemots, razor-bills, puffins, kittiwakes and shags. The best view is enjoyed...

Not as architecturally distinguished as its sister at the opposite end of George Street, St Andrew Square is dominated by the fluted column of the Melville Monument, commemorating Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville (1742-1811), Dundas was the most powerful Scottish politician of his time, often...